How to Refocus on Your Wonderland

Description: This is my first guide aimed at helping tulpamancers who struggled with visualizing their wonderland's surroundings. I plan on going back and making changes in the future, but for now this is the most recent version of it.

Introduction

This guide expands on concepts described in Chupi?s and Nikodemos?s guides by explaining when and how to apply those skills in order to focus and achieve better visualization of your wonderland. I will briefly summarize the concepts described in these guides as I describe the following method, however these guides go more in depth on how to practice the skills used for this method.

This guide assumes you have a wonderland, but this method can also be applied to visualizing objects in a void. This method works best when active forcing, the process of providing your un-divided attention to your Tulpa, to minimize distractions.

Preface

I used to tell people my visualization was bad because I struggled to get a clear image of my Tulpa and my wonderland most of the time. I eventually realized that my ability to focus greatly impacted my ability to visualize my wonderland, and all of the black voids and blurry imagery were a result of poor focus. I put this guide together because this strategy really helped me to the point where I can confidently visualize my wonderland at any time and not get frustrated by it anymore.

The Process In Short

This method is slowly drawing your attention away from distractions and towards your wonderland. You start with setting your mind on visualizing a simple object and slowly working your way up, visualizing more complex objects one at a time until you become satisfied with your visualization.

Summary of the Visualization Skill

This skill is all about looking at an object and asking yourself how it should look, feel, take up space, etc. For example, if you have grass in your wonderland, one could ask about the color of the grass, the height and shape of the blades, what species of grass it is, if it’s made out of cotton candy, the texture of the grass, how it feels when you walk in it, etc. The more questions you can answer, the more information you will have about that particular object. Having more information allows you to visualize the details of that object more effectively and thus requiring a lot of your attention to create the object’s image.

A Detailed Walkthrough

Before you sit down to visualize your wonderland, your images may be foggy and you may have a bunch of distracting thoughts that are far more interesting than blurry, incomprehensible images. In this state, remember that your visualization is not bad, you’re just distracted and your visualization will get better.

The first step is to get in a comfortable position and think about slowing down. If you want to, doing a form of relaxation breathing may be helpful for getting settled.

Next, start with taking a simple object such as a sphere or a cube. What color is the sphere? Is it smooth or bumpy? Is it soft and squishy or firm like a billiard ball? What is the temperature of the sphere? Continue to visualize your simple object until you are satisfied and or bored.

Next, slowly move onto the next object. Suppose the next object is a tree. Is it a real tree or a fantasy creation? How tall is it? Could you climb it if you wanted to? Is the season changing the colors of the leaves? Is there a tree shape that “feels right?” As you visualize more and more details, your tree will feel more and more real.

If you feel satisfied with your visualization, then congratulations, you achieve better visualization! If you still feel like your visualization is still fuzzy or you are bored, slowly move onto an even more sophisticated object or instead look around you and visualize the ground, the sky, your Tulpa, any other neighboring objects, etc.

Suggestions

  • The key to this method is slowing down and shifting your attention to what you are visualizing. If you get bored and you warp yourself to a parade or a war zone, that can lead you to getting distracted again. More complex objects are supposed to be interesting for you to look at. If a tree isn’t to your taste, you could also do furniture, a vending machine, a weapon, etc. I recommend picking something you find interesting, because why have it in your wonderland if you don’t like it?
  • Visualizing moving objects are fine as long as it is not your starting object. I don’t recommend loud or overwhelming objects because the point is to calm down and focus, not feel overwhelmed and become distracted.
  • Unless you are really comfortable with what your Tulpa’s form looks like, I don’t recommend starting off with that. Like any other complex object, their form may be too much for you to focus on right now, but it won’t be after you built your way up to that level of complexity.
  • If your Tulpa is sentient, they can guide you to look at certain things, or they may ask for you to visualize something for them. Why not, right? They may surprise you with a real treat!

In Conclusion

Once you feel comfortable with your visualization, have fun! Now that your visualizations are stable, you can go ahead and visualize exciting things like flying on dragons or shooting aliens in space since your mind is so focused on the wonderland you most likely forgot about whatever else was distracting you and your immediate surroundings in real life.

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